Contact your Congressional Representative #SaveFiltering

We lost this round of the legal battle, which means the movies will need to remain down for at least the next couple of months.

 

The good news is that several members of Congress have already reached out, asking how to help save filtering! In fact, the very same team that got the Family Movie Act of 2005 passed is leading VidAngel’s efforts in Washington, DC.

 

Now is your chance to help! If VidAngel has improved the life of your family, please reach out to your senators and congressperson to make your voice heard.

 

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

Go to SaveFiltering.VidAngel.com and enter your ZIP Code to find the contact info for your Senators and Congressperson.

Then, reach out in one of the following ways:

  1. Most effective: Visit their office. You can drop off a letter if you have time.
  2. Very effective: Give them a quick phone call.
  3. Effective: Post to their Facebook or Twitter accounts.
  4. Least Effective: Emailing (often ends up in spam folders).

In your messages, please address the following:

  1. Describe how important streamed filtering has been to you and your family.
  2. Emphasize that hollywood should not have veto right when it comes to how you watch movies in your own home.
  3. Finally, ask congress to amend the Family Movie Act to make it even clearer that streamed filtering IS legal.

 

Remember, a small company got the Family Movie Act passed in 2005. Today, over 1 million Americans are watching VidAngel, and you have given us over $10 million.

 

We can win this.

 

Help save filtering by reaching out to representatives and sharing this video with friends. We are just getting started. Thank you so much for your support.

 

All the best,
VidAngel
#SaveFiltering

VidAngel Responds to 9th Circuit Decision, Now Calls on Supporters to Call Their Members of Congress

(Provo, UT—January 4, 2016) VidAngel, the market-leading entertainment platform empowering users to filter language, nudity, violence, and other content from movies and TV shows, is engaged in a high-profile legal battle with Disney, Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox, and Lucasfilm. These Hollywood studios have taken legal action in an effort to eviscerate the 2005 Family Movie Act and prevent VidAngel from lawfully empowering parents and families to filter content on modern devices.

 

Today, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals denied VidAngel’s request for an emergency stay of a preliminary injunction order recently issued against the service by a Los Angeles federal court.

 

CEO Neal Harmon has issued the following statement:

“Congress passed the Family Movie Act in 2005 because Hollywood had sued every company that offered content filtering for private, in-home viewing. Today, a small group of Hollywood studios, led by Disney, is using the legal process to try to render that law meaningless.

“We are asking our supporters to call their members of Congress and urge them to update to the Family Movie Act with new language that cannot be misconstrued in court, making it even clearer that filtering is absolutely legal in the streaming age.

“We are disappointed by today’s decision, but remain optimistic about our long-term prospects on appeal. Until our appeal is decided, we regret that VidAngel will not be able to offer filtered content. We continue to be grateful for the massive outpouring of support from across the country.”

 

VidAngel also encourages its supporters to go this page started by a Florida family in support of services such as ours: SaveFiltering.com

 

###

 

About VidAngel

VidAngel is the market-leading entertainment platform empowering users to filter language, nudity, violence, and other content from movies and TV shows. VidAngel’s success has been well documented, earning a #1 BestCompany.com user rating and making VidAngel one of the fastest growing entertainment companies in the U.S.

What’s Next for VidAngel?

Hi VidAngel customers,

 

As you may have heard, a federal judge asked us to take down our movies. But don’t panic yet! Here’s what happens next.

 

  1. We’re asking the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals for a stay of the preliminary injunction. If we are successful, the movies will likely be back up within 2 weeks.
  2. We’re also appealing the preliminary injunction to the 9th Circuit. If that’s successful, the movies will likely be back up in a matter of months.
  3. If neither of those efforts is successful, remember that we have $10 million in the bank to continue this fight all the way to the Supreme Court. We are very optimistic that we will win the legal battle!

 

Here’s how you can help:

 

  1. Watch and share the video below about why we believe VidAngel is legal.
  2. Go to savefiltering.com to sign the petition.
  3. Keep checking in until our movies are back up (and in the meantime add your favorite titles to your watch list).

 

 

Thanks so much for your support.

Love,
VidAngel

 

 

FAQs:

 

Why Can’t I Watch VidAngel Movies Right Now?

All movies are currently unavailable while we comply with the judge’s preliminary injunction. However, we are asking a higher court for permission to put all movies back up until the merits of the preliminary injunction are decided. If we are successful, we hope to have the movies back up by approximately January 12th.

In the meantime, you can continue to add your favorite titles to your watch list, so they will be ready for you once they return to our site. And although you can’t currently watch VidAngel movies, you can still read the filter listings for specific movies to make informed choices in your movie-watching.

 

Can I still watch movies with VidAngel?

We hope to have our first 3 VidAngel exclusives The Last Descent, The Abolitionists, and Life on Bitcoin up and running very soon. Over the next few months, we will continue to add new titles. Keep an eye out for updates.

We are also asking a higher court for permission to put all movies back up until the merits of the preliminary injunction are decided. If we are successful, we hope to have the movies back up by approximately January 12th.

 

What does this mean for my credits?  Will they be refunded?  

VidAngel credits never expire. Here’s what you can do with them:

  1. Wait until our movies are back. We’re asking the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals for a stay of the preliminary injunction. If we are successful, the movies will likely be back up within 2 weeks. Please stay tuned. And remember your credits are not at risk. We have $10 million in the bank from our recent investment round, so we can refund you at any time.
  2. Watch exclusive VidAngel content. Even though VidAngel is temporarily unable to offer movies, you will soon be able to view our VidAngel Exclusive content. Our first 3 titles – The Last Descent, The Abolitionists, and Life on Bitcoin – will be available very soon. In the next few months we will have an ever-growing list of titles available. You will be able to rent (not buy!) those titles using your credits.
  3. Cash out your credits. If you would like your credits refunded immediately, we’ll be disappointed but will make it happen. We hope, though, that you will choose option 1 or 2, and continue to stand with us to show the courts and Congress how very important our filtering service is to you.

 

How can I help?

Currently the best ways to support VidAngel are:

  1. Sign the #SaveFiltering petition at www.SaveFiltering.com
  2. Share our “Is VidAngel Legal?” video with your friends to help get our message out. (Video found in blog post above.)
  3. Watch the movies that will very soon be offered exclusively on our site (and generously tip the creators so VidAngel can bring in more titles!)

 

What does the preliminary injunction do?

To implement the preliminary injunction, VidAngel has to take down the movies while the court decides whether our service is lawful. We will not know the court’s decision until we have gone through trial and the entire appeal process.  We are also asking the many, many studios that chose not to sue us to permit us to continue to filter and stream their movies for the duration of the appellate process.

 

What percent of the current VidAngel movie library is affected by the lawsuit? Which studios are involved?

53% of titles are owned by the plaintiffs (Disney, Warner Bros., Twentieth Century Fox, and Lucasfilm). However, if we are unsuccessful in getting a stay of the injunction, we will not offer titles from ANY studios until the court has ruled that we have a legal right to do so. We expect to receive an answer by approximately January 12th.

Because the vast majority of studios have not challenged VidAngel’s service, we are reaching out to them to ask whether they would object if we make their titles available while the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decides whether the issuance of injunction was proper.

 

I currently own several movies from VidAngel. Am I able to continue to watch them with the filters I want?

The good news is that you still own your movie. The bad news is that we can’t currently stream it to you, but we are asking a higher court for permission to do so through the appeals process. We expect to receive an answer by approximately January 12th.

In the meantime, you may request that any disc you own be shipped to you (a processing fee of $5 per disc applies to this service). Or you may wait until content filtering becomes available again as the result of a stay of the decision on our appeal. Please note that because we are not allowed to make copies of filtered content, discs sent to you will be unaltered and thus unfiltered.

 

What is the status of the antitrust counter suit against the studios?

The judge heard arguments on the counterclaims Monday, Dec 19th, and said he hoped to issue a ruling within 7 days, but we have not yet received any ruling.

 

Have you started a petition to save filtering?

No, but a family from Florida started a petition at http://savefiltering.com. It has already received over 100,000 signatures.

 

Has Netflix been approached about licensing/including filtering?

Yes. Their agreements with the studios do not allow them to permit content to be filtered.

 

If the lawsuit results in the ability to license streaming how much would watching a filtered movie cost?

In that case, the studios would set the price at which they sell the licenses.  We hope to negotiate agreements that will allow us to offer filtered streaming prices comparable to those charged to watch unfiltered movies.

 

Can you sell/license your filtering function to the other companies who already have streaming services/agreements?

We attempted to do that but the studios’ license agreements prohibit distributors from allowing it. The major studios have never consented to allow anyone to stream filtered content.

 

Will it be possible to market the filter software to allow everyone to edit their own movies?

Our goal is to build a system that will enable you to create your own tags for filtering your movies.

 

Please explain how ClearPlay has been able to provide filtered content through Google Play? Is it doing something different from what VidAngel attempted to do in its early days?

VidAngel’s approach in 2013-14 was similar to ClearPlay’s current approach to streaming. VidAngel filtered Google Play content that customers could watch using the Chromecast streaming device.  As we prepared our filtering technology for launch, our Chromecast app was shut down and YouTube sent a cease-and-desist letter saying the service violated YouTube’s terms of use. VidAngel believes the terms-of-use agreement can also be invoked to end ClearPlay’s current service model, meaning that the studios can shut down ClearPlay at any time.

In contrast to VidAngel’s filtering method, the ClearPlay method is not able to filter high-definition (HD) content. It does not have apps for Roku, Apple TV, FireTV, Android, or iOS, and is unavailable for a large selection of movies. Additionally, the ClearPlay method does not permit the filtering of closed captioning, even though offering closed caption is mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act. VidAngel believes that it is close to achieving the filtering of closed captioning using its present technology.

VidAngel was founded to stream filtered HD content to families to watch popular movies on any device of their choosing. No other service is currently able to do that.

 

If the current business model gets shut down by the courts, could you follow a modified method without the VidAngel Sellback model?

Under the current injunction language, selling DVDs and Blu-rays and streaming them filtered (even without sellback) would still not be possible. The studios would like the court to hold that movies cannot be filtered without their permission, with or without sell-back and with or without streaming. The studios have never given anyone permission to filter movies for private, in-home viewing. They will not consent to allow VidAngel to filter content unless the appellate courts agree that our service is lawful or they decide to compromise in the face of our antitrust counterclaim.

 

Why doesn’t VidAngel try to settle out of court and obtain the licensing to stream and edit the movies?

We have repeatedly asked all the studios for licensing agreements. Although we believe our current business model is lawful under the Family Movie Act, obtaining licenses to stream filtered content would provide significant benefits to our customers by allowing them to avoid “out-of-stock” notices and watch streamed filtered content at the same time as streamed unfiltered content becomes available. Having such a license would make life easier for us, too.

All but a few small studios turned us down. Of all the studios, 4 chose to sue us. Some of the studios that chose not to join in the lawsuit have told us that they would be happy to negotiate a license to allow us to stream filtered content if they could do so. However, they are prevented from doing so by their current contracts. We hope the litigation will make that collaboration possible.

 

Will you ever offer subtitles for those of us who are hard of hearing?

Absolutely!  Subtitles are already in development.

 

If VidAngel loses the battle to protect its current business model, does VidAngel have a business model that will allow it operate successfully?

Our intention/goal is to defeat the lawsuit. December 12th’s ruling was the first battle in a long war we believe we will win. We hope that content produced by VidAngel Studios and filtering content that has lost copyright protection will enable us to operate a successful, albeit smaller, business.

 

Aside from the goal of stopping VidAngel from streaming movies, what’s the end-game for the Studios?

The studios are very motivated to keep directors happy, and historically directors do not like filtering. We believe the 4 studios suing VidAngel are trying to appease the directors and will likely continue to do so unless and until VidAngel’s rights are validated by the courts or by Congress.

 

If the lawsuit goes all the way to the Supreme Court, what is a realistic time-table for that process?

It will likely be a 3-5 year process to defend our service under the Family Movie Act all the way to the Supreme Court.

 

Would you ever consider licensing more independent and or foreign films?

Yes. Please submit your film to VidAngel Studios for review.

 

What kind of content will VidAngel Studios produce in regards to quality and type (shorts, TV series, movies), and will this content be released theatrically or streamed from VidAngel’s website exclusively?

Initially we will offer stand-up comedy, behind-the-scenes views of the lawsuit, and licensed content from independent filmmakers.  Those projects can be completed using our current resources without harming our legal defense.

 

Network television edits movies (or at least they used to); wouldn’t VidAngel fall under the same rights?

Those edited movies shown on television receive director sign off and, along with the filtered movies shown on airplanes, are expressly allowed by the collective bargaining agreement all the major studios have signed with the Directors Guild of America.  VidAngel’s filtering is different because the studios and the DGA do not permit filtered movies to be watched by families at home. That’s the key difference.

 

Will VidAngel be sharing my personal information with any of the Hollywood studios who are involved in the lawsuit?

No. VidAngel will not be sharing any personally identifying customer information with anybody. The current lawsuit only involves VidAngel as a company. There is no contention that VidAngel customers have done anything wrong.

Update on Preliminary Injunction

Dear VidAngel customers,

First, the bad news. The judge has issued a preliminary injunction against VidAngel, requiring that we pull down all the studios’ content. We are seeking a stay of this injunction, but if our efforts fail, we will need to take down the movies of all major studios.

Now the good news. This is the first battle in a long war. We will launch an immediate appeal. And unlike previous filtering companies, we have the funds to fight this all the way to the Supreme Court. We’re committed to protecting your right to watch filtered movies in your home.

In the meantime, we will be finding and creating family-friendly shows and movies so you can still watch quality content on VidAngel. This will be a gradual process, so please be patient with us. We will keep you posted as this develops.

Hang in there,
Neal Harmon, CEO of VidAngel

#ThisIsNotOver #SaveFiltering

Movies Coming in December

Go to new releases >

New releases coming in December, 2016.

More movies coming in December, 2016.

45 Years
A Christmas Kiss
A Christmas Star
A Merry Friggin’ Christmas
A Most Violent Year (2015)
A Princess for Christmas
Agent Cody Banks
All is Bright
Anaconda
Ashes and Diamonds
Bachelorette
Barbie in Princess Power
Barbie Mariposa and The Fairy Princess
Barbie: A Perfect Christmas
Battleship Potemkin (1925)
Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas
Black Beauty (1994)
Bonnie and Clyde (1967)
Boy and the World (O Menino e o Mundo) (2015)
Breathe (2015)
Christmas Eve
Coherence
Congo
Cowboy Bebop: The Movie (2001)
Down Periscope
Dracula: Dead and Loving It
Exit Through the Gift Shop
Fathers and Daughters
Frank (2014)
Gloria (2014)
Hands of Stone
Horns
Hush
In a World
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)
Jack Frost (1998)
Knight of Cups
Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (2015)
La Battaglia di Algeri (The Battle of Algiers) (1967)
La Vie en Rose
Laura (1944)
Let the Right One In(2008)
Letters to God
Letters to Santa: A Muppets Christmas
Man on Wire (2008)
Melancholia
Mickey’s Christmas Carol
Mickey’s Once Upon a Christmas
Mickey’s Twice Upon a Christmas
Mixed Nuts
Monster’s Ball
Noel
Ong Bak
Paris, je t’aime
Playtime (1967)
Pokémon: The Rise of Darkrai
Rebecca (1940)
Rock the Kasbah
Rope (1948)
Santa Claus: The Movie
Sing Street
Sunshine Cleaning
Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
Swiss Army Man
Synchronicity (2015)
The 39 Steps (1935)
The 400 Blows (Les Quatre cents coups) (1959)
The Best Man Holiday
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
The Brave Little Toaster
The Cat Returns
The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie) (1972)
The Family Fang
The Fitzgerald Family Christmas
The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus
The Immigrant
The Last Picture Show (1971)
The Ref
The Rules of the Game (1939)
The Rum Diary
The Secret of Kells
The Seventh Seal
This Christmas
Tokyo Story (Tôkyô monogatari) (1953)
Traitor
Tremors 5: Bloodlines
We’re Back!
Wuthering Heights (2009)
[We’ll add more than three times this many movies in December, but these are the ones we are definitely adding!]

Want a movie we don’t have?

Learn how to request a movie here.

Movies leaving VidAngel in December, 2016.

None. 😉

Movies Coming in November

Go to new releases >

New releases coming in November, 2016.

More movies coming in November, 2016.

Accepted
Airheads
American Graffiti
Cars Toon: Mater’s Tall Tales
Chasing Liberty
Clerks
Cop and a Half
Crimewave
Doc Hollywood
Doctor Strange (2007)
Doom
Dragnet (1987)
Dreamgirls
Duck Tales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp
Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd
Empire Records
Envy
Every Which Way But Loose
Fantasia
Fantasia 2000
Fear and Desire
Final Fantasy: Advent Children
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within
Fly Away Home
Gambit
Girl with a Pearl Earring
Hang’Em High
High Plains Drifter
House Bunny
Krull
Kull the Conqueror
Last Action Hero
Mallrats
Matinee
My Life in Ruins
Nick and Norah’s infinite Playlist
Nick of Time
Operation Dumbo Drop
Planes
Quarantine
Red Dawn (1984)
Rio Grande
Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion
Sgt. Bilko
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon
Smokin’ Aces
South Park, Bigger, Longer, and Uncut
Spanglish
Strangers on a Train
Terms of Endearment
The 6th Day
The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension
The Adventures of Milo and Otis
The Beastmaster
The Blue Lagoon
The Brothers Grimm
The Cannonball Run
The Conversation (1974)
The Fly (1986)
The Great Mouse Detective
The Host (2013)
The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete
The Killing (1956)
The Ladykillers (2004)
The Legend of Drunken Master
The Man Who Wasn’t There
The Man with One Red Shoe
The Miracle Worker (1962)
The Remains of the Day
The Rundown
The Secret of NIMH
The Sweet Hereafter (1997)
The Thomas Crown Affair (1968)
The Tuxedo
Thumbellina
Titan AE
Twilight Zone: The Movie
UHF
Veggietales: The Pirates Who Don’t Do Anything
Volcano
White Men Can’t Jump
Wonder Woman (2009)
Year One
Yellow Submarine

[We’ll add more than twice this many movies in November, but these are the ones we are definitely adding!]

Movies leaving VidAngel in November, 2016.

None. 😉

Want a movie we don’t have?

Learn how to request a movie here.

Is VidAngel Legal?

Dear VidAngel customers,

 

VidAngel is being sued by Disney, Warner Bros., 20th Century Fox, and Lucasfilm. You might be asking, “Are these studios just trying to get buzz by piggybacking on the VidAngel brand?” We’ll let historians answer that.

But first, the bigger question: is VidAngel legal?

 

We say we’re legal. Disney says we’re pirates. But Disney made Pirates 2 through 4, so who is the real criminal here?

Whatever you believe, know that if VidAngel gets shut down, it’s the end of filtering. Here’s why.

 

In 2005, Congress passed the Family Movie Act to protect the choice to filter. Just as a director gets to choose what goes into a movie, a family watching at home gets to decide what to mute and skip — and filtering is like a fancy remote to make muting and skipping easier. So everyone has their choice.

Sure, what a director puts in may offend some viewers, and what a viewer takes out may offend some directors. But being offended doesn’t mean you get to make choices for other people, or else college students would rule the world.

Well, Hollywood didn’t like that law, so they signed secret contracts with the Directors Guild and streaming companies to create a “force field” against filtering. The contracts said no one could filter or partner with filtering companies — basically blocking filtering from the whole streaming market.

(We only know all this because Sony got hacked by North Korea and their contracts became public. Probably because North Korea’s a big fan of filtering — just not the voluntary kind.)

 

And this is where VidAngel comes in — because that force field blocked us 4 times.

  1. We teamed up with Google to filter their licensed Google Play movies, but Hollywood told Google no.
  2. We tried to license directly and the studios said no, even though we had the money.
  3. We tried to buy discs directly and they said no.
  4. We made a product that let you filter movies you already bought on YouTube. They got it shut down. (Our competitor, ClearPlay, does essentially the same thing, and if they ever get big enough to be a threat, the studios will probably shut them down too.)

Basically, the force field worked. For 10 years no one could stream filtered movies, proving that Disney is so magical they can make Congressional laws disappear.

 

But the Family Movie Act struck back. Congress already knew Hollywood hated filtering, because before 2005 there had been about a dozen filtering companies, and Hollywood sued — let me check my math — all of them! They sued every filtering company!

So, the Family Movie Act said filtering companies don’t need Hollywood’s permission. They just need to meet 3 requirements:

  1. The movie is an authorized copy
  2. Watched in the privacy of the home, and…
  3. No permanent filtered copy is created

Notice that Hollywood here is like your fiancé’s parents — it’d be nice to get their approval, but if you can’t, you’re still doing this thing. Also, they’ll never give their approval! In my experience.

 

So what happens when Congress wants a company to exist, but Hollywood doesn’t? Well, it’s gonna be a weird company.

To filter streamed movies despite the Hollywood force field, VidAngel has to buy authorized DVDs and Blu-rays (requirement 1) from retailers, sell them to customers, stream the filtered movie to customers at home (2), without making a permanent copy (3) — meeting all 3 of Congress’s requirements. That’s pretty weird. But weird is not the same as illegal. Just ask Shia LaBeouf.

For instance, it’s weird for a startup to provide $1 movies without the studios’ permission, and to pay by buying discs, instead of licensing. But it was weird when Redbox did all those things too, and they were legal — though the studios tried and failed to shut them down.

It’s also weird that VidAngel decrypts discs. But if you’ve ever used a DVD player, then so have you, and you’re probably legal. So let’s look closer.

 

First, the discs. A law called the DMCA forbids unauthorized decryption of discs. Here’s why we think VidAngel’s OK.

 

1. The DMCA doesn’t apply here

Congress wanted the Family Movie Act to protect filtering companies from unfair Hollywood lawsuits. So they made clear that filtering companies meeting those 3 requirements would be immune to Copyright Act lawsuits. And since the DMCA is part of the Copyright Act, it shouldn’t apply here.

But even if it did…

 

2. Decryption is necessary to fulfill the Family Movie Act

Without decryption, Hollywood’s force field makes it impossible to filter at all. So either VidAngel can legally decrypt discs, or Congress passed a law that didn’t change the law. And you may not like Congress. They still know what laws are.

So we decrypt movies in order to add filters, then re-encrypt them to keep the copyrighted material protected. Plus…

 

3. VidAngel is legal under Fair Use

The Fair Use doctrine allows companies like VidAngel to use copyrighted works, since our use is transformative and the lawful filtering increases Disney’s movie sales.

 

Meaning…

  1. The DMCA doesn’t apply here
  2. We didn’t break it anyway, and…
  3. Even if we had, Fair Use makes that legal

So to quote MC Hammer, and those jerks at the Louvre, “You can’t touch this!”

 

Now, Hollywood claims our reasons are bogus, and decryption isn’t the legal way to stream filtered movies. But when we ask what that legal way is, their only answer is the YouTube method we tried earlier, which they got shut down! That’s like your fiancé’s parents saying, “No, don’t marry this daughter. But how ‘bout this other daughter you already dated, who we murdered?

In other words, there aren’t other options for streaming filtered movies. VidAngel is filtering’s last stand!

 

Now, the piracy accusers say we don’t pay Hollywood enough. But remember, we pay them just like Redbox, by buying discs. And just like Redbox, we have to buy a lot or we go out of stock. In fact, we spend about 1/3 of our revenue on discs. So if we’re pirates, then we’re terrible pirates. Just not as terrible as Pirates 2 through 4.

And again, we want to cooperate with Hollywood! We want licensing! But Hollywood seems determined to crush the entire filtering industry.

 

VidAngel isn’t a loophole! It’s a last resort.

 

So here’s how you can help:

  1. Keep using VidAngel and sharing it with your friends. The more customers we bring in, the better. And regardless of what the judge decides, you customers will never be held liable for using VidAngel.
  2. Go to SaveFiltering.com and sign the petition to help protect VidAngel. Every voice matters.
  3. Share this post, especially with our critics. We know some people will never love us. But we hope we can convince them we’re not criminals. We’re just trying to protect the personal choice of families.

We’ll keep you posted on the case. In the meantime, thanks for your support. You help make filtering possible.

 

(This blog post will soon be available in video form.)

Legal Battle

VidAngel Halloween Contest 2016

UPDATE: Congratulations to our VidAngel Halloween Contest Winners!!
VidAngel halloween winners!

Grand Prize: Mike K with “Movie Night”!
Best Costume: Instagram: @sarahcobabe Sarah C!
Best Pumpkin: Michael Chin C!
Best Decorated Dessert: Lori Boody B!
If you haven’t already, please message us your VidAngel account email address so we can send prizes 🙂

VidAngel costume dude

Dress up as your favorite movie or TV character (or in a VidAngel costume) for a chance to win a FREE YEAR OF VIDANGEL MOVIES*!

 

Now’s your chance to celebrate your favorite spooky holiday and get some VidAngel love in return! We will feature your posts on our site, and then choose winners in each category.

 

HOW TO ENTER:

1.  Take a picture of you wearing a movie or tv show character costume (VidAngel costumes get extra points!), carving a VidAngel pumpkin, and/or decorating VidAngel cookies or desserts.

2.  Post your picture on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter using #VidAngelHalloween. Make sure the post is public!

3.  Get friends and family to like/share your post!

 

PRIZES:

GRAND PRIZE WINNER:
Free Year of VidAngel Movies ($100 of VidAngel credit)

First Place Costume:
$50 in VidAngel credit

First Place Pumpkin:
$25 in VidAngel credit

First Place Cookies/Dessert:
$25 in VidAngel credit

 

RULES AND GUIDELINES:

Winner will be chosen by VidAngel and will be based on creativity, effort, and number of likes/shares on social media. (VidAngel costumes will get bonus points!)

Family/group costumes and doing all three categories (costume, pumpkin, and dessert) makes you more likely to win! Each group can only win one prize.

If you are under the age of 18, you must have parent or guardian’s permission to participate.

Starts now and ends Oct. 31 at 11:59PM MST. We will choose winners within three days after that.

Your post must be public (so we can see it) and have #VidAngelHalloween in the description to be entered.

Please do not post anything inappropriate, vulgar or that you wouldn’t want your Grandma Susie to see. We will not accept or feature on our site any entries we deem inappropriate.

No purchase necessary to enter or win. A purchase does not increase your chance to win.

By participating you agree to our Terms and Conditions.

 

 

*$100 in VidAngel credit, which is equal to 100 SD VidAngel movie nights (or 50 HD movie nights) with filters, when movies are sold back within 24 hours. The average person generally watches around 67 movies per year.